Home Online Earning Number of staff at scandal-hit Oxfam earning more than £100000 has doubled in seven years

Number of staff at scandal-hit Oxfam earning more than £100000 has doubled in seven years

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  • In 2009/10, Oxfam employed five executives on more than £100,000 a year 
  • But the latest figures, for 2016/17, show the total reached 11, including the CEO
  • On top of his £127,753 salary, CEO Mark Goldring claimed expenses of £12,006 

Daniel Martin, Policy Editor For The Daily Mail

The number of Oxfam staff earning six-figure salaries has doubled in just seven years.

In 2009/10, the charity employed five executives on more than £100,000 a year. 

The latest figures, for 2016/17, show the total reached 11, including chief executive Mark Goldring who earned £127,753.

On top of his salary, Mr Goldring claimed expenses of £12,006 and was handed pension contributions of £12,818.

The number of Oxfam staff earning six-figure salaries has doubled in just seven years. The latest figures, for 2016/17 show chief executive Mark Goldring (left) earned £127,753

The number of Oxfam staff earning six-figure salaries has doubled in just seven years. The latest figures, for 2016/17 show chief executive Mark Goldring (left) earned £127,753

The figures, published in Oxfam’s annual reports, reveal the number of staff with salaries of more than £60,000 has almost tripled from 32 to 93 over the seven-year period, while the total wage bill increased 48 per cent to £121.9million last year.

Deputy chief executive Penny Lawrence was on £99,082, plus £9,941 pension contributions, before she resigned on Monday.

Deputy chief executive Penny Lawrence (pictured) was on £99,082

Deputy chief executive Penny Lawrence (pictured) was on £99,082

Deputy chief executive Penny Lawrence (pictured) was on £99,082

Last night an Oxfam spokesman said: ‘Oxfam is very aware of not allowing senior pay to escalate by more than necessary while still enabling us to recruit and retain staff.’

She claimed that Mr Goldring’s salary was less than bosses at other charities of similar size and scope, ‘and considerably less than someone could expect to earn running an organisation of the same size and complexity in the private sector’.

She added: ‘In 2016/17, Oxfam’s chief executive was responsible for the charity’s work in 51 countries, plus a network of 630 UK high street shops and more than 27,000 volunteers. 

The role entails a degree of complexity and time commitment that goes far beyond that of a typical chief executive because of the high-profile nature of our charity and the multiple stakeholders that must be dealt with.’

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