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Six Ways To Dramatically Improve Your Agency's Content

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During a recent podcast, my guest,&nbsp;C.C. Chapman, made a rather blunt statement about agency content creation. His assertion? Every day, agencies violate the “speak human” mantra. Instead of treating potential and current clients respectfully, they throw out acronyms and gibberish, making readers scratch their heads and ultimately turn away.

And we have the audacity to wonder why clients are tuning us out.

To be sure, Chapman is the no-nonsense, straight-shooting author of books such as Content Rules&nbsp;and Amazing Things Will Happen. In this case, he’s also brutally correct. If agencies want their content to have punch and traction, they need to stop writing for each other and begin writing for people who aren’t enmeshed in agency jargon.

In other words, it’s time to wipe the slate clean and start creating content your clients can actually appreciate.

Differentiate, for goodness’ sake.

What separates one agency from another? It’s not all the bold logos or shiny websites — every agency has those. Instead, it’s the culture and brand, the community of individuals who make up the agency. To truly distinguish itself, agencies have to define their uniqueness. Are they playful? Outdoorsy? Musically inclined? These are the differentiators that matter. When a prospect has to choose between three relatively similar agencies, chemistry counts.

Where does content come into this picture? Most clients do their homework online by examining digital footprints. According to Demand Gen Report,&nbsp;roughly half of all clients&nbsp;will read no fewer than three content pieces before contacting a prospective agency. Besides, marketers recognize and respect smart content. According to a survey by LinkedIn,&nbsp;nearly three-quarters&nbsp;of marketers have a content strategy for their businesses, allocating&nbsp;as much as 46% of their budget to content marketing. If an agency’s web presence is as sterile as a hospital room, it’s in dangerous territory.

Here’s the irony of this situation: Agency owners are branding experts. They know they need to develop strong brands that both attract and repel their clients, but they’re petrified to do the same for their own shops. Is the fear justified? Only for those driven solely by money and nothing else. The reality for agencies is that, in order to get on qualified targets’ consideration lists, they have to put out bold, unapologetic content so “stalkers” get the lay of the land instantly.

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Shutterstock

During a recent podcast, my guest, C.C. Chapman, made a rather blunt statement about agency content creation. His assertion? Every day, agencies violate the “speak human” mantra. Instead of treating potential and current clients respectfully, they throw out acronyms and gibberish, making readers scratch their heads and ultimately turn away.

And we have the audacity to wonder why clients are tuning us out.

To be sure, Chapman is the no-nonsense, straight-shooting author of books such as Content Rules and Amazing Things Will Happen. In this case, he’s also brutally correct. If agencies want their content to have punch and traction, they need to stop writing for each other and begin writing for people who aren’t enmeshed in agency jargon.

In other words, it’s time to wipe the slate clean and start creating content your clients can actually appreciate.

Differentiate, for goodness’ sake.

What separates one agency from another? It’s not all the bold logos or shiny websites — every agency has those. Instead, it’s the culture and brand, the community of individuals who make up the agency. To truly distinguish itself, agencies have to define their uniqueness. Are they playful? Outdoorsy? Musically inclined? These are the differentiators that matter. When a prospect has to choose between three relatively similar agencies, chemistry counts.

Where does content come into this picture? Most clients do their homework online by examining digital footprints. According to Demand Gen Report, roughly half of all clients will read no fewer than three content pieces before contacting a prospective agency. Besides, marketers recognize and respect smart content. According to a survey by LinkedIn, nearly three-quarters of marketers have a content strategy for their businesses, allocating as much as 46% of their budget to content marketing. If an agency’s web presence is as sterile as a hospital room, it’s in dangerous territory.

Here’s the irony of this situation: Agency owners are branding experts. They know they need to develop strong brands that both attract and repel their clients, but they’re petrified to do the same for their own shops. Is the fear justified? Only for those driven solely by money and nothing else. The reality for agencies is that, in order to get on qualified targets’ consideration lists, they have to put out bold, unapologetic content so “stalkers” get the lay of the land instantly.

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